The Library of Congress > LCCN Permalink

View this record in:  MARCXML | LC Authorities & Vocabularies | VIAF (Virtual International Authority File)External Link

Caucasian Albania

LC control no.n 85237705
Descriptive conventionsrda
Geographic headingCaucasian Albania
    Browse this term in  LC Authorities  or the  LC Catalog
Geographic subdivision usageCaucasian Albania
Variant(s)Albania (Ancient kingdom)
Kavkazskai︠a︡ Albanii︠a︡
Кавказская Албания
Qafqaz Albaniyası
Albanii︠a︡ (Ancient kingdom)
Ran (Ancient kingdom)
Rani (Ancient kingdom)
Эретия
Ėretii︠a︡
Aran
Arran
Agvank
Ereti
Gafgaz Albanii̐a
Aghuanitsʻ Ashkharh
Aghuankʻ
Aghvankʻ
Aluank
Qafqaz Albaniya
Ardhan
Special noteNon-Latin script reference not evaluated.
Found inGei︠u︡shev, R. B. Khristianstvo v Kavkazskoĭ Albanii, 1984: t.p. (Kavkazskoĭ Albanii) p. 3 (gosudarstvo Albanii︠a︡; also named Ran in Syrian; Rani or Ėretii︠a︡ in Georgian; Aran in Arabic; Agvank in Armenian; and in sci. lit. Kavkazskai︠a︡ Albanii︠a︡) p. 146 (Caucasian Albania; existed 4th cent. B.C. to 8th cent. A.D.)
Bolʹsh. sov. ėnt︠s︡ikl., 3rd. ed.: v. 1, p. 391 (Albanii︠a︡ Kavkazskai︠a︡; ancient govt. in eastern Caucasus headed by a King; main city named Kabala)
Oxford class. dict., 1970: p. 34 (Albania (Caucasian); land adjacent to eastern Caucasus and western Caspian)
Webster's new geogr. dict., 1980: p. 24 (Albania; ancient country of east Caucasus region corresponding largely to Azerbaijan SSR and south Daghestan ASSR, USSR; and inhabited by Scythian tribesman)
Encyc. Brit., 1972 ed.: v. 1, p. 512 (Albania--ancient name of part of Azerbaijan SSR in eastern Caucasus; Albani were largely driven into Armenia by Khazars)
Nurii̐ev, A. B. Gafgaz Albanii̐asynyn shu̇shă ma'mulaty vă isteḣsaly tarikhi, 1981.
Movsēs, Kaghankatuatsʻi. Patmutʻiwn Aghuanitsʻ ashkharhi, 1983: t.p. (Aghuanitsʻ ashkharh) added t.p., etc. (Aluank; Aghvankʻ)
Girdiman tarixi, IV-IX äsrlär, 2010: page 447 (Girdiman contained Qabala = Kabala, the main city of Qafqaz Albaniya, as well as other important cities in Qafqaz Albaniya) p. 55-83 (a sketch of the major attempts to locate the territory of Girdiman in Azerbaijan)
Wikipedia, December 11th, 2021: (Caucasian Albania is a modern exonym for a former state located in ancient times in the Caucasus: mostly in what is now Azerbaijan (where both of its capitals were located). The modern endonyms for the area are Aghwank and Aluank, among the Udi people, who regard themselves as descended from the inhabitants of Caucasian Albania. However, its original endonym is unknown)
Academic Kida, December 11, 2021: (Caucasian Albania (or Aghbania) was an ancient state that covered what is now southern Dagestan and most of today's Azerbaijan of the Caucasus. For much of its history, the Caucasian Albania was a part of the Persian Empire)
Wikipedia (in Russian), September 6th, 2022: (Ancient Caucasian Albania lay on the south-eastern part of the Greater Caucasus mountains. It was bounded by Caucasian Iberia (present-day Georgia) to the west, by Sarmatia to the north, by the Caspian Sea to the east, and by the provinces of Artsakh and Utik in Armenia to the west along the river Kura.Thes e boundaries, though, were probably never static at times the territory of Caucasian Albania included land to the west of the river Kura. Albania or Arran in Islamic times was a triangle of land, lowland in the east and mountainous in the west, formed by the junction of the Kura and Aras rivers,Mil plain and parts of the Mughan plain, and in the pre-Islamic times, corresponded roughly to the territory of the modern-day Republic of Azerbaijan. The districts of Albania were: Cambysene Getaru Elni/Xeni Begh Shake Xolmaz Kapalak Hambasi Gelavu Hejeri Kaladasht The kingdom's capital during antiquity was Qabala (Gabala; Kapalak). Classical sources are unanimous in making the Kura River (Cyros) the frontier between Armenia and Albania after the conquest of the territories on the right bank of Kura by Armenians in the 2nd century BC. The original territory of Albania was approximately 23,000 km2. After 387 AD the territory of Caucasian Albania, sometimes referred to by scholars as "Greater Albania,"[21][citation needed] grew to about 45,000 km². In the 5th century the capital was transferred to Partav in Utik', reported to have been built in the mid-5th century by the King Vache II of Albania, but according to M. L. Chaumont, it existed earlier as an Armenian city)
Wikipedia (in English), September 10th, 2022: (Caucasian Albania is a modern exonym for a former state located in ancient times in the Caucasus: mostly in what is now Azerbaijan (where both of its capitals were located). The modern endonyms for the area are Aghwank and Aluank, among the Udi people, who regard themselves as descended from the inhabitants of Caucasian Albania. However, its original endonym is unknown. The prefix "Caucasian" is used purely to avoid confusion with modern Albania of the Balkans, which has no known geographical or historical connections to Caucasian Albania. Little is known of the region's prehistory, including the origins of Caucasian Albania as a geographical and/or ethnolinguistic concept. In the 1st century BC and the 1st century AD, the area south of the Greater Caucasus and north of the Lesser Caucasus was divided between Caucasian Albania in the east, Caucasian Iberia in the center, Kolchis in the west, Armenia in the southwest and Atropatene to the southeast. In 252, Caucasian Albania acknowledged the suzerainty of the Sasanian Empire, appearing among its provinces in Shapur I's inscription at the Ka'ba-ye Zartosht. The kingdom would remain an integral part of the empire until its fall. By the end of the 3rd-century, the kings of Caucasian Albania were replaced with an Arsacid family, and would later be succeeded by another Iranian royal family in the 5th century AD, the Mihranids)